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for lo logistics i'll try to give 30 second notice. >> currently the nsa is holding for five years. the business record data many people suggested it's too long. what do you think about shortening the time whether nsa or some other entity hold it? our analysts think somewhere around three years is probably the least that you could do. and so if we did that, it goes back to what congressman said, i
different formats. the sources of the meta-data in the data legally collected by the nsa under various authorities as well as data provided to nsa by foreign partners. to be perfectly clear this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have
i think people have questioned the policies of thes nsa. i think the policies you carry out have been questioned they have been carried out as patriots as evidenced by the fact that almost the majority of the congress actually voted to end the surveillance program and
an official outside of the nsa to provide prior approval of what would be reasonable, arcticble suspicious in order query a name and ask for the information? >> if i could, let me just address because my internet was
and the numbers that are currently on the list. only 22 people at nsa are authorized to provide numbers to approve numbers and about 30 are allowed to look into that database and that's it.
? >> that is correct. those shots they showed lead people to believe that we nsa or the united states collected that information is false and it's false that it was collected on european citizens. it was neither. >> it certainly has created an
the assertions by reporters in france. >> zero mondo and italy that nsa collected tens of millions of phonecalls are completely false. they cite his seven screen shots of a result of a web tool used for data management purposes but both they and the person that stole the classified data did not understand what they were looking at. the web tool counts metadata
shortening the time whether nsa or some other entity hold it? our analysts think somewhere around three years is probably the least that you could do. and so if we did that, it goes back to what congressman said, i think three years makes sense that's what our analysts come up with. >> thank you i yield back. >> thank you, mr. chairman. many others have been running and hiding.
confirmed inspector general of the nsa to provide an extra independent check. we are discussing ways to change the makeup of the fisa court to grant the perception that is controlled by one political party or another. we are looking into creating a privacy advocate and nonexecutive branch lawyer they would take an independent position on matters before the fisa court and involve significant construction or interpretations of the fisa law. the most intriguing but also the
] >>> tonight on c-span the house intelligence committee holds a hearing ons nsa surveillance program and later trayvon martin's mother testifying at the hearing on stand your ground laws. .. only those recognized to speak will be allowed to. >> and those who are not in compliance will be removed from the committee room. i would like to welcome our first panel today. the director of the national intelligence james clapper deputy attorney james cole national security or keith alexander the deputy director of the nsa chris ingalls. following the first panel we will move immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing will provide an open forum to discuss amendments to the surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled at the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how the proposal is under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur and encourage members to answer questio
nsa programs that included spying on foreign leaders in a house intelligence hearing today. in the testimony, national intelligence director james clapper and nsa director keith alexander says data collected was provided to the nsa by other country's intelligence agencies. this hearing is chaired by michigan congressman mike rogers. [inaudible conversations] >> i'll only accept the decorum and only those recognized to speak. i'd like to welcome the first pam today, director of the national intelligence, james clapper, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how propos
.s. news about nsa spying on its allies. did you know that was being done. >> guest: europe in s foreign country. we collect foreign intelligence. in best interest, from national security standpoint and other interests as well. as you heard keith alexander say, much of that data collection has been used to help avert props in europe that might have effort wise happened. so our allies ben from the collection we do and that is important national security issue, that we do collect foreign intelligence. host host chairman diane fines stein, democrat fromce californ, said yesterday that the intelligence panel has been left in the dark about a program that has been occurring over the last decade. >> guest: i don't know what goes on in senate intelligence. i know what goes on in the house intelligence. we have keith alexander up often what is going on in the intelligence activities, data collection. c cia is up there often to do the oversight responsibility. i don't feel that april in the house side, i don't know what goes on in the senate. >> host: you were briefed as a we were spying on u.s.
because i think at nsa we are really worried about conflation of the public record. so what, using the terry stop standard means, the comparison to stop and rest. that would mean a police officer write down the reason for a stop and frisk as we do for the telephone metadata. only one of 22 supervisors approve the stopped and frisked before it would happen. and in our case, the data is all anonymous as opposed to the stop and frisk the point in front of you. the stop and frisk standard we have post in query audits every 90 days, as when a police department audits every 90 days what happens. and we also report to court every 30 days and get it free authorized every 90 days. so while yes, in a legal sense, the legal standard in the lives from the terry stop standard i think just those factors alone distinguished the use of that standard in this context and clearly evidence that the far, far more regulated and rigorous process than is feasible in the search context. >> thank you. i'm going to open with kind of a general question. since the revelation of the 215 program, which wasn't se
about. what i want to talk about is the fact that the nsa surveillance has been going on further than the bush era. it's been going back to late jay edgar hoover when the eavesdrop on martin luther king jr. and they blackmailed him. i think it's kind of like synonymous with what's going on with mark kell. i was wondering if he could speak i'm not. thank you. >> guest: i don't know what your question is. but the nsa which didn't exist until 1952 by the way, the nsa has, according to the revelations of that we are now seeing from edward snowden has gone on to what anyone realize beyond the wiretapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. it's hard to believe a terrorist would call her up and say i'm a terrorist and just that i would let you know we are going to blow up a building. doesn't sound very likely that they should be doing that. at least that's my opinion. >> host: what do you make of the revolution's overall but the work the nsa is doing and how that either helps or contributes to what the work at the fbi and the cia do? >> guest: well, the fbi is an important agency obviou
intelligence gathering above all is about protecting security. allies thatre our the u.s. is not using the nsa intelligence gathering capabilities to promote america's economic interest? use intelligence capabilities for that purpose. we use it for security purpose. first of all. second of all, it's important to recall, too, that we have extremely strong and important intelligence security relationships with our allies and those relationships are help keep american safe, to help keep american safe abroad, and to help keep our allies safe. that kind of relationship, those are key relationships to the security of this nation and our allies. again, we are conducting a review. disclosuresul these have caused tension in our relationships. we deal with those issues diplomatic channels. and we are in direct communication with a number of countries on these matters. ,he president is very serious as you heard him say in august, about making sure when these reviews take place, that we strike that balance, that we remember our intelligence people who dohe extraordinary work to keep us we areery day, and
. the most damaging thing taken place in the last year is not the fight over the budget, but the nsa controversy, the irs controversy, all that, which is not only been dismissed by the government, but defended by the president saying that, well, that's just them. i didn't do that. nebraska's been punished for these things, and people are beginning to become afraid of the very government, and that's the danger to the democratic system. >> anyone else with a quick comment? >> i think also the kind of spending that happened with the stimulus and how it's very apparent that a lot of federal funding goes towards politically connected groups of people just as well as certain law changes like delaying the employer mandate, but keeping the individual mandate on the books when it comes to the president's health care law. i think people are paying more attention. they have more access to more varied view points on what's happening in washington, and they learn too many of our lawmakers are not representing the interests of the american people well, but their own interests and interest of well
and civil liberties oversight board discuss changes to the nsa's data collection and surveillance programs. and later the senate's back to work on a bill to end workplace discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people followed by votes on judicial nominees to the u.s. district courts. >> the woodrow will soften center recently hosted a discussion with the chief of the international atomic energy agency, yukiya amano. he addressed his agency's role in the monitoring programs of iran, north korea and syria. his remarks ran about 50 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the wilson center. a special welcome to our guest this morning, director yukiya amano of the international atomic energy agency, the iaea. i'm mike van diewns, executive vice president. modern technology kept our president and ceo, jane harmon, on the tarmac in new york city, rather, at laguardia airport for over two years ago this morning. she has just landed and will be here shortly and will make a closing comment. she apologizes, but we wanted to get started. the wilson center is a public very private i
by the n.s.a. because a few numbers may solve an authorized investigation. supporters of bulk collection practices have defended this program as an important tool in the fight against terror. they have said that this is a mechanism to access the logs quickly and they are not actually listening to the content. president obama even said, and i'll quote, "when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your telephone call. instead, the government was just sifting through this so-called met aadata" madam president, the president is right. they are not listening to the actual calls like the f.b.i. conducting a wire tavment but let me outline that the government can figure out what is going on i from those call logs. for example, they will know that an american citizen in nevada received a call from the local n.r.a. office and then called their representative and senators. but they claim that the content of that call remains safe from government intrusion. or they'll also know that a nevadan from las vegas called a suicide prevention hotline and spoke to an individual for 12 minutes.
of communication, whether with the fbi or the nsa. with the fbi, you have review in the field office. you would review at the fbi justiceters or, to the department and have a review there. and it would go to fisk and you would have a review there. and thee review meticulousness and the care that people put into these things is substantial. of dialogue back and forth between every level, among every level with this. there is back-and-forth with doj and fbi. i always took it as a huge amount of my response ability to make sure that i maintain at all times the credibility of the justice department in front of the five the court -- fisa court for muscle it was transparent what was going on. and when we made mistakes, as we did, we brought them to the attention of the court and we tried really hard not to make mistakes. it was really the justice doingment in my opinion his job, executing its responsibilities to order the constitution and the delegates were there to make sure that the properly.ecuted we will do our best to make sure it is enforced in the right way. if they have not met the standards,
you about afghanistan. but i want to start with the dustup over the n.s.a. allegedr our, you know, espionage of friends and allies around the world. >> still alleged? pretty muchit is acknowledged. i tried to get an explicit acknowledgement out of the and they haven't gone that far. >> what was the apology for if haven't acknowledged it? anyway. about angelament merkel is that the united states is not and will not be in on her phone conversations. there was never any statement about the past tense. was always current, future. did you know this was going on? you got all of the security -- specifically. i think the most that i would have known would have been the would have been the intelligence assessments. saying specifically where they came from. in other words, it could be say, well, that the source of assessment would be high level officials, for instance, in a country. but you don't know that was one on one or transferred anonymously in conversation. whether it was overheard. the source is -- they don't describe in the reports that we get that so and so's phone was -- conversa
>> they sent nsa letters country teaking how you do or don't do your job and only learn about it when some more intelligence is disclosed from leakers. i want to know, and this would also require all denials and modification of fisa orders and now or changedded legal interpretation of fisa, and i'd like to know from you, and we start with general alexander, would there be harm to sources and methods to making this change? >> well, knot as you described it, but i'm not familiar with it. i'll pass it down to the attorney general. not that i know of, but i'm not, at least the way you've described it giving access to the committee on certain things, it is our intent any time we see significant like that is to report it to the committee, so we would never want to -- >> just seems to me they have a different window, i say a better window, to what's going on, and anything they see as an issue should be shared with us so if there needs to be changes made, we could do that. mr. cole? >> congressman, i think the real issue comes down do what is in the application, what is in the order,
that is the nsa program gathering metadata or suspicious activity or porting programs and -- suspicious activity or reporting programs. there has been a shift to collecting lots of data. there is a question as to whether that is an effective webster'sk at william community report on the fort hood shooting. one of the conclusions is that missedgence analysts intelligence because of a relentless work load created by an explosion of data they have to process. there is a question about whether this is adding more hay to the haystack and an ineffective way to police. >> thank you for bringing up those points. you also highlighted that law enforcement has a couple of rolls. they have the role of investigating crimes. -- law enforcement has a couple of roles. isrge, you mentioned there an effort to try to do this within the realm of protecting civil liberties. there is a history of cases where some of those civil liberties have been abused so checks have been put in place. i would like to ask your view on where those checks are effective and where you might have some concerns. there are a lot of checks
to have that level playing field if we're going to succeed. >> does, do the geopolitical tensions over nsa stuff, is that damaging to the prospects of a t-tip agreement? >> look, it is obviously a serious issue that is out there. our view is that these issues are to be kept on separate tracks, in the right lanes of dialogue between officials on both sides. you have heard from a number of europeans that they see the logic of moving ahead with t- tip. it is important to their growth strategy to tighter -- to try to maintain competitiveness. we are hopeful we will continue to make progress on that. we have teams in brussels. there are negotiations that had to be canceled during the shutdown of the government but are back on track. we expect to continue those discussions in the coming weeks. >> a number of people have mentioned regulatory alignment, in autos. can you give us more detail of what that means in practice? if you are bmw, what are the challenges of having different regulatory regimes on both sides of the atlantic? >> one is obvious the crash testing. cars have to be crash tested in
? intelligence officials assume we will over correct this. there will be a move to really constrain what the nsa and our andlligence agencies do talksf the 9/11 report about it. quite sure, it can go too far. -- >> sure. we are not anywhere near going to far. the pendulum can go to far. the whole nsa metadata issue is hard and fast. give you my views on it but nonetheless, i have not seen the pendulum swing too far yet. >> i have spoken to some officials, some off the record -- >> i don't think he's unstable. very friendly conversations, first of all. he's very direct, some of the about us ande said our people. i don't understand politics, by the way. why is he saying things that make it either on likely, less less likely,ikely, what's the politics? i don't get it. on the politician. forsee they say things public consumption -- i'm the politician. i know it's rare. once in a great while the politician will say something for the public that they don't exactly believe themselves or would say differently. why is he saying the things? the conversation i want to emphasize is that they are friendly, v
definition of self-defense. this is a tough time for nsa. everyone says, what are you doing and why are you doing it? when we get together, we actually say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today and telling you why thenfended these programs having give them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and have people killed. span,is weekend on c- intelligence officials defend the nsa intelligence program at a house hearing. saturday at 10 a.m. eastern. live funds on c-span 2, your phone calls and comments for kitty kelley. both tv's noon on "in-depth." in november,end remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness events surrounding the assassination. sundays at 3 p.m. eastern. >> this painting was originally painted as my grandmother's .fficial white house portrait in the 1960s, lady bird johnson went looking for portraits of first ladies to bring hang in the white house. they thought it was important. she looked h
nsa spying and iran's nuclear program. this is 15 minutes. >> afternoon. aftert afternoon -- good noon. jonathan coleman and i just finished a working lunch where we reinforced of the close ties between the united states and new zealand. having fought together in every major conflict of the last century, including afghanistan, our bonds are rooted in common interests but also in the history and values we share. our partnership is important. it is important to peace and prosperity in the asia-pacific and the united states remains committed to strengthening this partnership as one opponent of our rebalance to the region. we emphasized the significant progress we have made in expanding our defense cooperation since the washington declaration was signed last year. in addition to high-level visits like this one, we have had a productive set of exercises and training initiatives. the first joint defense policy talks in almost three decades and a successful meeting of pacific army chiefs from asia- pacific nations, which are two nations -- our two nations cochaired. global peacekeeping operat
in the same time frame. watch sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> this is a tough time for n.s.a. where everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the n.s.a. surveillance program. this morning at 10 eastern. live sunday on c-span 2 your calls and comments for kitty kelley, best selling author of unauthorized buying fiss of jackie e, nancy reagan, the bush family. on c-span 3 remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of his november 1963 asass pace in. last week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to afghanistan and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman talked about
about the drone attacks. the nsa revelations have undermined some confidence. now, there's a number of different reasons, but i think what i'm going to do is point out the reasons why i think we have not had as much success as we had hoped in terms of building broad support for our campaign and, second, what we ought to do about it. i think the reasons why are fairly clear. number one, as i mentioned, is the drone strikes. it has gotten a fair amount of attention. you know, the number of civilian casualties, the justification for those attacks. the world is focused on this. now, i do believe that drones are getting an unfair portion of the blame here. a drone is a weapon of war. i don't think the rest of the world would feel any better if we were launching cruise missiles from out in the ocean. i don't think that changes it. there's a little too much of an emphasis on how this has fundamentally changed things, that a drone is more dangerous than sending in a seal team on launching a bunch of cruise missiles. they're not the perfect instrument they are sometimes described to be, and
that's the nsa program on gathering meta data or look at internet traffic or suspicious -- or local police department which train officers to identify even at times lawful activity like public photography and forward that to a national data base. there's been a shift to collecting lots and lot of data. there's a question whether it's an effective model. you look at, for example, william webster's committee report on the fort hood shooting. one of the conclusions is that the intelligence be the analysts there missed intelligence about hasan in part because of a relentless workload. there's a question about, i mean, in proashial terms whether it's adding more hay to the hay stack and an effective way to police. >> so -- >> thank you for bridging up those point. you also highlighted that law enforcement has a couple of roleses. they have the role of investigating crimes. in today's threat environment some expectations of preventing attacks as well. and george, you mentioned there's a cognizant effort to try to do it within the realm of protecting civil liberty. there's a history of cas
these have occurred. how do i know they occurred? hold on. nsa spies on other people. and so we see what the other people have collected from american companies. of course, the law prevents us from saying here is a big bank. they lost this amount of money. we thought we can't say anything. so the public debate is miss informed in some ways because of a t not established that precisely. there are legal obstacles to information sharing. you've heard about that. i don't know about the antitrust. all the companies say antitrust. i don't know how true it is. the privacy obstacles are more important. there are a few sectors that made progress. i look at financial service and telecom. they made progress because it's in the business interest do better at cybersecurity. other places very little progress. so easy and energetic 12-year-old could probably be a good cyberattacker. i've had some unusual experiences this year. and the one i think the most unusual for me was a big international conference -- which was the shut down? october 17th. i thought people expressing pity for the united. we weren
the last piece of week or two, u.s. surveillance practices. about 80% of the work agencies u.s.nsa is outside the and is not governed by statutes. it is governed partially by guidelines that you or your predecessors put in place. are you looking at whether those reduction provide any -- any protection for foreign nationals? can you give any assurances abroad that the government is not doing this willy-nilly? >> as the president has indicated and he is right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities to make sure we are striking a balance to keeping the american people safe and their allies safe. and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people. we are in conversations with our partners in new york and other parts of the world to make sure -- in europe and other parts of the world to make sure we strike that balance. we can do certain things is not necessarily mean we should do these things. i think that is the chief question that has to be resolved. it is almost a cost-benefit. what is the benefit we are receiving and what a
that the nsa does is actually outside the u.s. and basically, an government -- not governed by statute. at whether those guidelines provide any protection for foreign nationals or whether there is sufficient protection? that any assurances can be given from this government? >> as the president has indicated, and he is totally right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities. to make sure that we are striking an appropriate balance between keeping the american people safe and our allies safe, and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people, who are in conversations with our partners in europe and other partners around the world to make sure that we strike the appropriate balance. there are some fundamental questions we have to ask ourselves. simply because we can do certain things does not necessarily mean we should. that, i think, in some ways is the chief question that has to be resolved. what is the cost to benefit? what is the benefit we are receiving? what are the protections we are generating? against the privacy that we nec
clapper and nsa direct or general keith allen discussed the nsa surveillance program and spying on foreign governments before the house intelligence committee hearing earlier this week. >> i never expected to write an entire book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age. i was diagnosed at 36. i was astonished at how different i thought it was -- how different i was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer and what i expected cancer be. and i sort of expected it -- i expected it to run like a well oiled machine in which cure wasn't obviously guaranteed, but people knew about my particular cancer at be followed and what i found was being really, really different. i couldn't help but i started to write about it. >> the head of the wrecks on trans next round of talks, george washington university hosted regional experts were monday. a farmer winning presidential candidate and former official at the american embassy in a rant to our commenting on prospects for the agreement. the impact of president rouhani election. nuclear weapons talks begin on november 7.
. >> congratulations, senator. welcome. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> this is a tough time for nsa where they said, what are you doing or why are you doing it? here's what we do. when we get together, we don't -- well, maybe a couple times we whine -- but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend the nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attackedded. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having begin them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program on a house intelligence committee hearing. saturday morning at ten eastern. live sunday on c-span2, your calls and comments for kitty kelly, best selling author of unauthorized biographies, nancy reagan, the british royal family, the bush family, and others at noon on booktv's "in-depth," and on c-span3's american history tv, each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy, eyewit
in august. they have an opportunity to see what the issues were. nsa previously testified, they did generate an aggressive memorandum laying out new guidance to try and address a lot of the issues. >> how many of the 49 recommendations as the department finished implementing? >> we got a lot of flurry of act to that in the past two days, which is a byproduct of hearing so we are grateful. roughly half is my belief, but we look at you an answer at the precise number for the record. we track these recommendations on a quarterly basis. we send a reminder to the department that this is an open recommendation and how are you progressing on getting to closure on it. it's a process that we've had in place. i'm told now by my colleagues at 26 of the 49 are open. >> 26 out of 49 remain open. there's been some exchange of information back and forth between our follow-up staff and the department, were indications of the progress is being made, but we have not gotten enough information to say they've met the requirements of the recommendation geared >> so their 23 still in process? >> no, they're a 26.
together with nsa's information insurance director, the csp program that dha has goes on and on, and my main point is that private sector and government are working well together. we have align for the right goals, but i don't see a problem in that regard. >> laura? >> yeah, i just want to respond, particularly to dan's points and jim's point. there's a real danger here we think by checking the box we addressed the underlying concern speaking here about privacy. we have a privacy and civil liberties oversight board, no resources, no money, and no teeth; right? the idea we have one, great. we have pias, the records notices, and we have exceptions that are routinely used by dhs and others in sense of the regard of the metric programs. we have a privacy act 40 years old and no longer does what it was set out to do. we have foya with exceptions for gnarl security routinely used to deny reasonable activity. now we've seen with walton releases, and august of this year, it was release reasoning without providing too much information a joshed lying issues, and what we found out is that a secret
examine nsa l surveillance programs. the witnesses are scheduled to director of national intelligence, james clapper, and the al keith alexander, director of the national security agency and the head of u.s. cybercommand. next an update on the affordableion of the care act and the status of the website for signing up for health insurance. washington journal, this is 40 minutes. >> joining us for a discussion, serving as a rie senior correspondent. welcome. >> thank you. >> what's the latest we know the condition of the website. >> the subcontractor is part of verizon had an outage last night. morning.till down this i checked before i arrived. that's a woe in the long saga dogged health care.gov. there was a congressional earing in the house where key contractors came in, talked about how they recommended more earlier. was not done. how the last minute the federal the ials turned off browsing function to require people make accounts. that created a backlog. hearings.ore a lot of attention and focus on the website. allowed to useot the website -- from the time they saw, they were not ab
.m.. we'll hear from top national security officials about the nsa surveillance program, including questions about spying on u.s. allies. span 3 and c-on c- span.org at 1:30 p.m. eastern time.
with the defense industrial base together with nsa information assurance director, it goes on and on. my main point is a private sector and government are working well together. we have to align for the right goals but i don't see a problem in that regard. >> i want to respond to dan's point. there is a real danger here by checking the box we address the underlying concern and i'm thinking of privacy. we have privacy and civil liberty board with no subpoena authority, no money and no teeth. the idea that we have one great, but what can it do? we have exceptions for national security that are routinely used with regard to the biometric program and the privacy act which is almost 40 years old and no longer does what it set out to do. we have exceptions for national security that are routinely used to design even request for legal reasoning why someone has engage in certain activity. we have seen with judge reggie walton's release in august of this year that actually you can release legal reasoning without providing too much information about the underlying tissues and a secret court secretly carved o
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
. [applause] >>> tonight on c-span the house intelligence committee holds a hearing ons nsa surveillance program and later trayvon martin's mother testifying at the hearing on stand your ground laws. ..
attacked and people killed. >> intelligence officials defend the nsa surveillance program at an intelligence hearing. sunday, your comments .or kitty kelly that is at noon on book tv. tv,on american history remembering john f. kennedy. accounts of kennedy possis assassination. kennedy's assassination. >> this was originally painted as my grandmother's official white house orchard. in the 1960s lady bird johnson went looking for portraits of first ladies to rehabbing in the white house. that was important, and she could not find my grandmother's portrait. she called and said, do you know where that painting is? my grandmother said, yes, it's on my wall. mrs. johnson said you should not ,ave that. my grandmother said no, that's my payment. it's on my wall, and that's where it's going to stay. i think mrs. johnson tried a couple more times, and >> watchy she gave up. that on our website or see it on c-span. we continue our series as we look at first lady eisenhower. >> the senate foreign relations committee held a hearing on syria. than 100,000 syrians into an a half years of
of nuclear power. you can watch a live beginning at 11:30 a.m. eastern. >> this is a tough time for nsa. everybody says, what are you doing? why are you doing it? we say, it together is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings and it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today and telling you why we defended these programs then having give them up and having nations attacked and people killed. >> intelligence officials defend a houseprogram at hearing. saturday at 10 a.m. eastern. span 2, your calls and comments for a best-selling kelley.kitty that is at noon on book tv "in depth." and remembering john f. kennedy. hisevents surrounding assassination. sunday at 3 p.m. eastern. >> what is the most important issue congress should consider in 2014? that is a question for middle and high school students in the c-span student cam video competition. .t shows various points of view you have a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. this year we have doubled the number of winn
- called nsa spying concerns. do you have an update, and do you think these meetings have improve relations between the u.s. and the eu? >> there's no question that the kind of communication we have had with the european allies have been very important and very useful when it comes to making clear how much we value the kind of security cooperation that our nations have and that we have with europe in general. comes toal when it keeping americans safe, when it comes to keeping our european allies safe. there are the tensions that of been caused by these disclosures are ones that we knowledge and ones that we are addressing directly in our communications with european nations and other nations who have been part of the disclosures. >> [indiscernible] >> i would not speak for any european nation or any other allied nation, but we believe the kind of medication that we have engaged in has been effective and useful in making we value those relationships, how important our cooperation is when it comes to national security issues and intelligence matters and how much more broad our relations veryb
and i attended probably 50 to 100 meetings at nsa headquarter at langly at fbi headquarter where all of the attorneys and all the leadership of the criminal programs and intel programs got together and trying to figure out under what circumstance could we work together? how could we share information and gain assistance from the intel community without cardiovascularring them and forming the secret alliance that was not required. now, later the fbi indicted the organization dismanhattan th -- dismantled them. he was trying to perpetrate $150 million fraud on nasdaq. we prevented that. we did a great deal of good in the case. everything was going just wonderfully until -- it wasn't even the defense attorneys, it was doj attorneys going prosecute and oversee the prosecution and show up and say, hi, cia, open your books. we want to see what help you gave the fbi. sources and methods. well, their welcome was soon wornout when they did that. rightfully so. you have two competing interest in the system. a right of a defendant know what the government did to him or her and why. and how and
-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program in a house committee. -- kelley,elly author of biographies. .nd american history tv remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of the assassination. sunday at 3 p.m. eastern. >> president obama met with iraqi prime minister to talk about the partition between the u.s. and iraq. he addressed the syrian civil war and iran's nuclear program. this is about 20 minutes. >> all set? all set? i want to welcome back prime minister maliki to the white house. it's been two years since the last u.s. troops left from iraq, but the strategic partnership between our two countries remains very strong. we honor the lives that were lost, both american and iraqi, to bring about a functioning democracy in a country that previously had been ruled by a vicious dictator. and we appreciate prime minister maliki's commitment to honoring that sacrifice by ensuring a strong, prosperous, inclusive and democratic iraq. >> [speaker translates] >> we had a wide-ranging discussion about economic issues, regional issues, and security issues. [speaker tr
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